How to Remove Chemical Odour from New Wardrobes

The layer of lacquer on large wooden wardrobes works to keep the wood’s colour, prevent cracking and maintain the material’s natural pattern.

This protective layer of lacquer is where the odour of new wardrobes comes from.

When we detect an odour on a new wardrobe, we might first associate it with formaldehyde.

In fact, formaldehyde is an essential component of adhesives. If the content level of this chemical does not exceed recommended levels, it is not likely cause damage on your body.

Since formaldehyde and benzene are colourless and odourless, a new wardrobe’s odour usually comes from paints and lacquers.

Here are some tips to remove a new wardrobe’s odour, brought to you by Deco-Man.

 

Ventilation

The easiest, most commonly used method is to air the wardrob. Especially in summer, when you open the windows and create a well-ventilated space, the smell as well as the formaldehyde can dissipate effectively.

This method usually takes around 3 months. You are going to need a lot of patience with that!

 

White vinegar

White vinegar is a highly accessible and straightforward solution to the odour problem. Just prepare a basin of water, add vinegar in it, and leave the basin of mixture in the room you are airing.

Open the wardrobe doors to let the odour get absorbed by the vinegar water.

 

Pineapple

Fruit fragrances can help remove undesirable smells.

Pineapple as a fruit with coarse fibres can absorb the smell of paint from the wardrobe, and leave a pleasant aroma in the space. It speeds up the deodorising process and can be kept in the space for a long time.

 

Air fresheners

Choose an air freshener which removes odours left by a renovation. These air fresheners contain ammonium compounds which react with harmful chemicals to neutralise them, subsequently removing the odour.

 

Activated carbon

It is difficult to tell whether the activated carbon you have purchase is authentic. To test it, pour some of the carbon into water. Authentic activated carbon should bubble, while substandard products will make the water fogged and dirty.

On a side note, do not store activated carbon in high temperatures, since it is a flammable material.

Anthony Lau

Author: Anthony Lau

From the humble beginnings of a self-taught DIY lover to the Youtube DIY heartthrob, DIY Anthony has never stopped cultivating his art of do-it-yourself. Be it a scratched drywall or a leaky bathtub, he’s got it all under control with ten nimble fingers and a can-do attitude.

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